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Texas Marijuana Law, Regulation, Penalties, Attornies & Congressman

Texas Marijuana Penalties

 
Offense Penalty Incarceration   Max. Fine  

Possession

2 oz or less Misdemeanor 180 days $ 2,000
2 – 4 oz Misdemeanor 1 year $ 4,000
4 oz to 5 lbs Felony 180 days* – 2 years $ 10,000
5 – 50 lbs Felony 2* – 10 years $ 10,000
50 – 2000 lbs Felony 2* – 20 years $ 10,000
More than 2000 lbs Felony 5* – 99 years $ 50,000
* Mandatory minimum sentence

Sale

7 g or less for no remuneration Misdemeanor 180 days $ 2,000
7 g or less Misdemeanor 1 year $ 4,000
7 g to 5 lbs Felony 180 days* – 2 years $ 10,000
5 – 50 lbs Felony 2* – 20 years $ 10,000
50 – 2000 lbs Felony 5* – 99 years $ 10,000
More than 2000 lbs Felony 10* – 99 years $ 100,000
To a minor Felony 2* – 20 years $ 10,000
* Mandatory minimum sentence

Cultivation

See Possession section for penalty details.

Hash & Concentrates

Possession of less than 1 g Felony 180 days – 2 years $ 10,000
Possession of 1 – 4 g Felony 2 – 10 years $ 10,000
Possession of 4 – 400 g Felony 2 – 20 years $ 10,000
Possession of more than 400 g Felony 10 years – life $ 50,000
Manufacture or delivery of less than 1 g Felony 180 days – 2 years $ 10,000
Manufacture or delivery of 1 – 4 g Felony 2 – 20 years $ 10,000
Manufacture or delivery of 4 – 400 g Felony 5 – 99 years $ 10,000
Manufacture or delivery of more than 400 g Felony 10 years – life $ 10,000

Paraphernalia

Possession of paraphernalia Misdemeanor N/A $ 500
Sale of paraphernalia (first offense) Misdemeanor 1 year $ 4,000
Sale of paraphernalia (subsequent offense) Felony 90 days* – 1 year $ 4,000
To a minor Felony 180 days* – 2 years $ 10,000
* Mandatory minimum sentence

Miscellaneous

Falsifying a drug test Misdemeanor 180 days $ 2,000
A person’s driver’s license is automatically suspended on final conviction of a drug offense.

Penalty Details

Possession

Possession of 2 ounces or less of marijuana is a Class B misdemeanor, punishable by up to 180 days imprisonment and a fine not to exceed $2,000.

Possession of between 2 and 4 ounces of marijuana is a Class A misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment of up to 1 year and a fine not to exceed $4,000.

Possession of between 4 ounces and 5 pounds of marijuana is a felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 180 days imprisonment, a maximum of 2 years imprisonment, and a fine not to exceed $10,000.

Possession of between 5 pounds and 50 pounds of marijuana is a felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of no less than 2 years imprisonment, a maximum sentence of 10 years imprisonment, and a fine not to exceed $10,000.

Possession of between 50 pounds and 2,000 lbs of marijuana is a Second Degree felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 2 years imprisonment, a maximum sentence of 20 years imprisonment, and a fine not to exceed $10,000.

Possession of more than 2,000 pounds of marijuana is a felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 5 years, a maximum sentence of 99 years, and a fine of no more than $50,000.

See

  • Texas Stat. Code § 481.121
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.33
  • Texas Stat.Code § 12.34 
  • Texas Stat.Code § 12.35
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.21
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.22

Sale

The sale or delivery of 7 grams of marijuana or less, as a gift, is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 180 days imprisonment and a fine not to exceed $2,000.

The sale or delivery of 7 grams of marijuana or less, is a misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment of up to 1 year and a fine not to exceed $4,000.

The sale or delivery of between 7 grams and 5 pounds is a felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 180 days imprisonment, a maximum of 2 years imprisonment, and a fine not to exceed $10,000.

The sale or delivery of between 5 pounds and 50 pounds of marijuana is a second degree felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 2 years imprisonment, a maximum sentence of 20 years imprisonment, and a fine not to exceed $10,000.

The sale or delivery of between 50 pounds and 2,000 pounds of marijuana is a first degree felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 5 years imprisonment, a maximum sentence of life imprisonment, and a fine not to exceed $10,000.

The sale or delivery of more than 2,000 pounds of marijuana is a felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison, a maximum sentence of life imprisonment, and a fine not to exceed $100,000.

Selling marijuana to a child is a Second Degree felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 2 years imprisonment, a maximum sentence of 20 years imprisonment, and a fine not to exceed $10,000.

See

  • Texas Stat.Code § A481.120 
  • Texas Stat. Code § A481.122
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.32
  • Texas Stat. Code §12.33
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.35
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.21
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.22

Cultivation

Cultivation in Texas will be punished based upon the aggregate weight of the plants found. See the “Possession” section for further penalty details.

Hash & Concentrates

Hashish and concentrates are not considered marijuana.

See

  • Texas Stat, Code § 481.002(26)(A)

Possession of hashish or concentrates is a crime. If hashish or concentrates is less than one gram, the offense is considered a state jail felony punishable by term of imprisonment no less than 180 days and no greater than 2 years and a fine no greater than $10,000.

If the amount of hashish or concentrates is more than 1 gram but less than 4 grams, the offense is considered a felony of the third degree punishable by a term of imprisonment no less than 2 years and no greater than 10 years and a fine no greater than $10,000.

If the amount of hashish or concentrates is greater than 4 grams but less than 400 grams, the offense is considered a felony in the second degree punishable by a term of imprisonment no less than 2 years and no greater than 20 years and a fine no greater than $10,000.

If the amount of hashish or concentrates is more than 400 grams, the offense is punishable by lifetime imprisonment or a term of imprisonment no less than 10 years and no greater 99 years and a fine no greater than $50,000.

See

  • Texas Stat. Code § 481.116
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.35
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.34
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.33

Manufacturing and selling hashish or concentrates also is a crime. If the amount of hashish or concentrates is less than 1 gram, the offense is considered a state jail felony punishable by a term of imprisonment no less than 180 days and no greater than 2 years and a fine no greater than $10,000.

If the amount of hashish or concentrates is more than 1 gram but less than four grams, the offense is considered a felony of the second degree punishable by a term of imprisonment no less than 2 years and no greater than 20 years and a fine no greater than $10,000.

If the amount of hashish or concentrates is more than 4 grams but less than 400 grams, the offense is considered a felony of the first degree punishable by a term of imprisonment no less than 5 years and no greater than 99 years and a fine no greater than $10,000.

If the amount of hashish or concentrates is greater than 400 grams, the offense is punishable by lifetime imprisonment or a term of imprisonment no less than 10 years and no greater than 99 years and a fine no greater than $100,000.

See

  • Texas Stat. Code § 481.113
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.35
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.33
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.32

The sale of hashish or concentrates to a person under 18 years of age or a person enrolled in primary or secondary school is a felony, punishable by a term of imprisonment no less than 2 years and no greater than 20 years and a fine no greater than $10,000. This is only applicable if the offender is older than 18 years of age.

See

  • Texas Stat. Code § 481.122
  • Texas Stat. Code §12.33

Any device used for the purpose of creating hashish or concentrates is considered drug paraphernalia. Possession of any such device is a Class C misdemeanor punishable by a fine no greater than $500. Manufacturing, delivering, or possessing with intent to deliver any such device is a Class A Misdemeanor punishable by a term of imprisonment no greater than 1 year and/or a fine no greater than $4,000.

See

  • Texas Stat. Code § 481.002(17)
  • Texas Stat. Code § 481.125
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.23
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.21

If any of the previously listed offenses occurred within 1,000 feet of a school, youth center or playground, or within 300 feet of a public swimming pool or video arcade, the degree of the offense is increased by one level; i.e. if the offense was a felony of the third degree it is now a felony of the second degree and if the offense was a felony of the second degree it is now a felony of the first degree, etc.

See

  • Texas Stat. Code § 481.134(b)

If the perpetrator of any of the previously listed offenses was found to have involved a person under the age of 18, the degree of the offense is increased one level; i.e. if the offense was a felony in the third degree it is now a felony of the second degree, and if the offense was a felony of the second degree it is now a felony of the first degree, etc.

See

  • Texas Stat. Code § 481.14

Paraphernalia

Possession of paraphernalia is a Class C misdemeanor, punishable by a fine not to exceed $500.

Selling, or possessing with intent to sell or deliver, paraphernalia is a Class A misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment of up to 1 year and a fine not to exceed $4,000, unless the offender has previously been convicted of this offense, in which case the offense is a felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 90 days imprisonment and a maximum sentence of 1 year imprisonment.

Selling paraphernalia to a minor is a state jail felony, punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 180 days imprisonment, a maximum of 2 years imprisonment, and a fine not to exceed $10,000.

See

  • Texas Stat. Code § 481.125
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.35
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.21
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.23

Miscellaneous

Falsifying a drug test, or possessing with intent to use any material for the falsification of a drug test, is a Class B misdemeanor, punishable by up to 180 days imprisonment and a fine not to exceed $2,000.

See

  • Texas Stat. Code § A481.133
  • Texas Stat. Code § 12.22

A person’s driver’s license is automatically suspended on final conviction of: (1) an offense under the Controlled Substances Act or (2) a drug offense.

See

  • Texas Stat. Code § 521.372
Drugged Driving

This state has a per se drugged driving law enacted. In their strictest form, these laws forbid drivers from operating a motor vehicle if they have a detectable level of an illicit drug or drug metabolite (i.e., compounds produced from chemical changes of a drug in the body, but not necessarily psychoactive themselves) present in their bodily fluids above a specific, state-imposed threshold. 

Mandatory Minimum Sentence

When someone is convicted of an offense punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence, the judge must sentence the defendant to the mandatory minimum sentence or to a higher sentence. The judge has no power to sentence the defendant to less time than the mandatory minimum. A prisoner serving an MMS for a federal offense and for most state offenses will not be eligible for parole. Even peaceful marijuana smokers sentenced to “life MMS” must serve a life sentence with no chance of parole.

Texas Drugged Driving

In Texas, a person commits a DUI if the person is intoxicated while operating a motor vehicle in a public place. Texas Penal Code Ann. § 49.04 (Vernon 2009).

Affirmative Defense

The fact that the defendant is or has been entitled to use the alcohol, controlled substance, drug, dangerous drug, or other substance is not a defense. Id. § 49.10.

Implied Consent

  • If a person is arrested for an offense arising out of acts alleged to have been committed while the person was operating a motor vehicle in a public place the person is deemed to have consented to submit to the taking of one or more specimens of the person’s breath or blood for analysis to determine the alcohol concentration or the presence in the person’s body of a controlled substance, drug, dangerous drug, or other substance. Texas Transp. Code Ann. § 724.011(a) (Vernon 2009).
  • A specimen may not be taken if a person refuses to submit to the taking of a specimen designated by a peace officer. Id. § 724.013.
  • A person’s refusal of a request by an officer to submit to the taking of a specimen of breath or blood, whether the refusal was express or the result of an intentional failure to give the specimen, may be introduced into evidence at the person’s trial. Id. § 724.061.
  • Defendant arrested for DUI is not entitled to consult an attorney before deciding whether to take a test. Texas courts have ruled that since test is not ‘testimony,’ it isn’t protected. De Mangin v. State, 700 S.W.2d 329 (1985).
  • Officer is not required to allow defendant to choose which type of specimen he wanted to provide. Coggins v. State, 160 S.W.3d 177 (2005).
  • Implied consent statutes did not do not shield a defendant from blood draws pursuant to validly issued warrant. Dye v. State ,WL 361289 (2003).

Penalties

  • First offense Class B Misdemeanor – fine of up to $2,000; jail for 72 hours and up to 180 days; community service for 24 hours up to 100 hours; license suspension of up to one year; surcharge of $1,000 or $2,000 per year for three years. Id. § 49.04.
  • Second offense Class A Misdemeanor – fine of up to $4,000; jail for 72 hours to 365 days; community service for 80 hours to 200 hours; license suspension for 180 days to two years; surcharge of $1,500 or $2,000 per year for three years.
  • Third and subsequent offense Third Degree Felony – fine of up to $10,000; jail for two to ten years; community service for 160 hours to 600 hours; license suspension for 180 days to two years; surcharge of $1,500 or $2,000 per year for three years.

Other Penalties & Penalty Enhancer

  • If it is shown on the trial of an offense under this section that at the time of the offense the person operating the motor vehicle had an open container of alcohol in the person’s immediate possession, the offense is a Class B misdemeanor, with a minimum term of confinement of six days. Id. § 49.04.
  • DUI while vehicle is occupied by a passenger who is younger than 15 years of age is a felony. Id. § 49.045.

Sobriety Checkpoints

Texas has found sobriety checkpoints to be illegal under Texas interpretation of federal Constitution.

  • The checkpoint upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in Michigan v. Sitz, was authorized by legislation. In light of the fact that no such legislative authority grants Texas law enforcement the right to conduct checkpoints, checkpoints are illegal under the U.S. Constitution. State v. Holt, 887 S.W. 2d 16 (1994).

Case Law

Smithhart v. State, 503 S.W.2d 283 (1973) — Where evidence was insufficient to show that drug taken by defendant affected him to degree which would render him incapable of safely driving vehicle, conviction of defendant for operating motor vehicle while under influence of drugs could not be obtained on basis that valium taken by defendant may have had unusually severe effect on him because he had also been drinking vodka.

Lewis v. State, 708 S.W.2d 561 (1986) — Testimony that defendant had used marijuana and alcohol and was he was operating erratically supported DUI conviction, despite no chemical evidence.

Dickerson v. State, WL 475800 (2006) — Evidence of erratic driving and non-cooperative attitude, the fact that defendant admitted to drinking, and the fact that the defendant failed field sobriety tests were factually sufficient to convict for DUI.

Verified Texas Marijuana Attorney / Lawyer

Stephen Lyle Hamilton

361-760-1111

Stephen Lyle Hamilton

Hamilton, Hull & Rogers
500 N. Shoreline Blvd. Suite 703

Corpus Christi, TX 78401

www.attorneyhamilton.com

Phone: 361-760-1111

Martin LeNoir

214-744-3544

Martin L LeNoir

The Law Offices of Martin LeNoir
3300 Oak Lawn Suite 600

Dallas, TX 75219

www.martinlenoirattorney.com

Phone: 214-744-3544

Chad Austin West

214-509-7555

Chad Austin West

Chad West, PLLC
900 West Davis Street

Dallas, TX 75208

www.chadwestlaw.com

Phone: 214-509-7555

David B Sloane

817-810-0088

David B Sloane

Law Offices of David Sloane
933 West Weatherford Street Suite 200

Fort Worth, TX 76102

www.sloanelaw.com

Phone: 817-810-0088

Edward A Mallett

713-236-1900

Edward A Mallett

Mallett Saper Berg, LLP
4306 Yoakum Blvd Suite 400

Houston, TX 77006

www.msblawyers.com

Phone: 713-236-1900

Gerald Harris Goldstein

210-226-1463

Gerald Harris Goldstein

Goldstein, Goldstein & Hilley
310 S St Mary’s St #2900

San Antonio, TX 78205

www.goldsteinhilley.com

Phone: 210-226-1463

Mary Elizabeth Conn

713-357-4190

Mary Elizabeth Conn

Mary E. Conn & Associates
440 Louisiana Street, Suite 200

Houston, TX77002

maryconnlaw.com

Phone: 713-357-4190

Megan Roper

888-367-3420

Megan Roper

Roper & Mehler
120 W. Hopkins Ste. 102

San Marcos, TX 78666

www.dopestlawyersintown.com

Phone: 888-367-3420

Lawrence W Sauer Jr.

512-479-5017

Lawrence W Sauer

 
1004 West Ave

Austin, TX 78731

www.austindruglawyer.com

Phone: 512-479-5017

Graham E. Sutliff

512-616-2222

Graham Eugene Sutliff

Sutliff & Stout, PLLC
3600 Bee Cave Road #102

Austin, TX 78746

mytexasinjurylawyers.com

Phone: 512-616-2222

Kevin Bennett

512-476-4626

Kevin Matthew Bennett

The Law Office of Kevin Bennett
1411 West Ave Suite 100

Austin, TX 78701

www.kevinbennettlaw.com

Phone: 512-476-4626

Robert Keates

512-800-3741

Robert L. Keates

Keates Law Firm
700 Lavaca St #1400

Austin, TX 78701

keateslawfirm.com

Phone: 512-800-3741

Dustin R. Galmor

409-832-7757

Dustin Ryan Galmor

Galmor, Stovall & Gilthorpe
485 Milam Street

Beaumont, TX 77701

www.galmorstovall.com

Phone: 409-832-7757

Gilbert G Garcia

936-756-3333

Gilbert G Garcia

The Gilbert G. Garcia Law Firm
220 N Thompson Suite 202

Conroe, TX 77301

www.ggglawfirm.com

Phone: 936-756-3333

Jason Kercheval

936-900-3033

Jason Thomas Kercheval

The Kercheval Law Firm
101 Simonton

Conroe, TX 77301

www.jk2law.com

Phone: 936-900-3033

Amanda Webb

936-647-3352

Amanda Webb

The Webb Firm, P.C.
318 N. Main St.

Conroe, TX 77301

thewebbfirm.com

Phone: 936-647-3352

John Stuart Gilmore

361-882-4378

John Stuart Gilmore

 
622 S Tancahua St

Corpus Christi, TX 78401

Phone: 361-882-4378

Phillip W. Goff

361-592-4357

Phillip Wayne Goff

Law Office of Phillip W. Goff
545 N Upper Broadway St Suite #906

Corpus Christi, TX 78363

www.ccbeachlawyer.com

Phone: 361-592-4357

Richard Charles McConathy

972-233-5700

Richard Charles McConathy

Law Offices of Richard C. McConathy
15110 Dallas Pkwy #400

Dallas, TX 75248

www.mcconathylaw.com

Phone: 972-233-5700

Mark Dean Meisinger

214-906-3006

Mark Dean Meisinger

Law Office Of Mark Meisinger
4131 N Central Expressway Suite 680

Dallas, TX 75204

www.meisingerlaw.com

Phone: 214-906-3006

Paul Saputo

888-239-9305

Paul Saputo

Saputo Law Firm
1320 Griffin St. East

Dallas , TX 75215

saputo.law

Phone: 888-239-9305

Dawna Kim

214-562-3000

Dawna Kim

Law Offices of Dawna Kim
8111 Lyndon B. Johnson Fwy Suite 480

Dallas, TX 75251

DawnaKim.com

Phone: 214-562-3000

Franklyn Mickelsen Jr.

214-720-9552

Franklyn Mickelsen

Broden, Mickelsen, Helms & Snipes LLP
2600 State St.

Dallas, TX 75204

www.brodenmickelsen.com

Phone: 214-720-9552

Kirk F Lechtenberger

214-871-1804

Kirk F Lechtenberger

Kirk Lechtenberger, LLC.
2525 McKinnon Suite 420

Dallas, TX 75201

www.lechtenberger.net

Phone: 214-871-1804

Robert Sterling Guest

972-564-4644

Robert Sterling Guest

 
112 South Bois D Arc Street

Forney, TX75126

www.robertguest.com

Phone: 972-564-4644

Leslie Starr Barrows

817-481-1583

Leslie Starr Barrows

Barrows Firm
500 E. Belknap Suite A

Fort Worth, TX76102

www.barrowsfirm.com

Phone: 817-481-1583

Craig Allen Dameron

817-222-0624

Craig Allen Dameron

The Dameron Firm, PLLC
320 Purcey Street

Fort Worth, TX 76102

www.dameronlawfirm.com

Phone: 817-222-0624

Leslie Joyce Burgoyne

817-484-0210

Leslie Joyce Burgoyne

 
3005 E. Belknap Street

Fort Worth, TX 76111

Phone: 817-484-0210

Luke Williams

817-993-9249

Luke Williams

Barnett Howard & Williams PLLC
209 W. 8th St.

Fort Worth, TX 76102

www.bhwlawfirm.com

Phone: 817-993-9249

Erin K Copeland

713-489-6566

Erin K Copeland

Fibich, Leebron, Copeland & Briggs
1150 Bissonnet Street

Houston, TX 77005

www.fibichlaw.com

Phone: 713-489-6566

Christian Carl Samuelson

281-332-5600

Christian Carl Samuelson

The Samuelson Law Firm
955 Gemini St

Houston, TX 77058

www.texas-dwi-defense.com

Phone: 281-332-5600

Paul C Looney

281-597-8818

Paul C Looney

Looney & Conrad, P.C.
11767 Katy Freeway

Houston, TX 77079

www.LooneyConrad.com

Phone: 281-597-8818

Clay S Conrad

281-597-8818

Clay S Conrad

Looney & Conrad, P.C.
11767 Katy Freeway Suite 740

Houston, TX 77079

www.looneyconrad.com

Phone: 281-597-8818

Greg Gladden

713-880-0333

Greg Gladden

Law Office of Greg Gladden
3017 Houston Avenue

Houston, TX 77009

www.greggladden.com

Phone: 713-880-0333

Jordan E. Lewis

832-380-5195

Jordan Elliott Lewis

Jordan E. Lewis, P.C.
1914 N Memorial Way

Houston, TX 77007

www.jordanlewislaw.com

Phone: 832-380-5195

David A Breston

713-224-4040

David A Breston

Law Office of David A. Breston
405 Main Street Suite 1050

Houston, TX77002

www.davidbreston.com

Phone: 713-224-4040

Ned Barnett

713-222-6767

Ned Barnett

The Law Offices of Ned Barnett
8441 Gulf Fwy Ste 210

Houston, TX 77017

www.nedbarnett.com

Phone: 713-222-6767

Neal Andrew Davis

713-227-4444

Neal Andrew Davis

Neal Davis Law Firm, PLLC
917 Franklin St Suite 600

Houston, TX 77002

www.houstoncriminaldefenselawyers.com

Phone: 713-227-4444

Brent G. Burpee

512-743-1711

Brent Gregory Burpee

Burpee Law
118 Lynn Avenue

Lewisville, TX 75057

www.burpeelaw.com

Phone: 512-743-1711

Jeff C. Kennedy

817-605-1010

Jeffrey Charles Kennedy

Law Offices of Jeff C. Kennedy, PLLC
9133 Belshire Drive

North Richland Hills, TX 76182

www.criminallawyerfortworthtx.com

Phone: 817-605-1010

Deandra Michelle Grant

972-943-8500

Deandra Michelle Grant

Deandra M. Grant & Associates
800 East Campbell Road, Suite 110

Richardson, TX 75081

www.texasdwisite.com

Phone: 972-943-8500

Don Herbert Flanary III

210-738-8383

Donald Herbert Flanary

Flanary Law Firm
1005 S Alamo St

San Antionio, TX 78210

www.FlanaryLawFirm.com

Phone: 210-738-8383

Blakely Ian Mohr

844-664-7529

Blakely Ian Mohr

The Mohr Law Firm, PLLC
3030 Nacogdoches Rd. Suite 222H

San Antonio, TX 78217

www.themohrlawfirm.com

Phone: 844-664-7529

Christopher William Simpkins

210-273-4874

Christopher William Simpkins

The Law Office of Christopher W. Simpkins
315 Dwyer Avenue

San Antonio, TX 78204

www.csimpkinslaw.com

Phone: 210-273-4874

Shawn Smith

210-405-9243

Shawn Smith

Soyars and Morgan Law, P.C.
310 South St. Marys Suite 1860

San Antonio, TX 78205

www.shslawoffice.com

Phone: 210-405-9243

Patrick L. Hancock

210-223-8844

Patrick L Hancock

Law Offices of Patrick L Hancock
1800 McCullough

San Antonio, TX 78212

www.hancockcriminaldefense.com

Phone: 210-223-8844

John-Michael B House

210-414-4882

John-Michael B House

 
315 Dwyer

San Antonio, TX 78204

Phone: 210-414-4882

Patrick T Peranteau

210-212-9098

Patrick T Peranteau

Masson & Peranteau, PLLC
310 S Saint Marys St Suite 1240

San Antonio, TX78205

www.massonandperanteau.com

Phone: 210-212-9098

Matt Horak

713-225-8000

Matthew Patrick Horak

Horak Law
1790 Hughes Landing Blvd #400

The Woodlands, TX 77380

www.matthoraklaw.com

Phone: 713-225-8000

Dustin E Nimz

940-766-5335

Dustin E Nimz

Law Office of Dustin E. Nimz, PLLC
900 8th St Suite 1030

Wichita Falls, TX 76301

www.nimzlaw.com

Phone: 940-766-5335

Texas Congress

 

Senate Bills

Daines/Merkley Veterans Equal Access Amendment

Permits physicians affiliated with the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to recommend cannabis therapy to veterans in states that allow for its therapeutic use.

Mikulski Amendment Protecting State Medical Marijuana Laws

Limits the Justice Department’s ability to take criminal action against state-licensed operations that are acting in full compliance with the medical marijuana laws of their states.

Merkley Marijuana Banking Amendment

Prohibits the US Treasury Department from using federal funds to take punitive actions against banks that provide financial services to marijuana-related businesses that are operating legally under state laws.

Senators

Ted Cruz (R)

TEXAS

 

Grade: C

Votes

Comments

“When it comes to a question of legalizing marijuana, I don’t support legalizing marijuana,” he told Hugh Hewitt in April. “If it were on the ballot in the state of Texas, I would vote no. But I also believe that’s a legitimate question for the states to make a determination…I think it is appropriate for the federal government to recognize that the citizens of those states have made that decision, and one of the benefits of it, you know, using Brandeis’ terms of laboratories of democracy, is we can now watch and see what happens in Colorado and Washington State.” 2/4/2016 (Link)

John Cornyn (R)

TEXAS

 

Grade: F

Votes

Comments

When asked about Congressional action on the CARERS Act of 2015, ““I don’t think we need to go there,” added Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, the No. 2 Senate Republican and former Texas attorney general and state Supreme Court justice. “This is a more dangerous topic than what a lot of the advocates acknowledge.” 3/24/2015 (Link)
“Cornyn said he worries that decriminalization, medical usage and removing marijuana laws from federal enforcement is a slippery slope “where a similar attitude would be embraced with regards to other illegal drugs and dangerous substances.”” 7/11/2014 (Link)

House Bills

Veterans Equal Access Amendment

Permits physicians affiliated with the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to recommend cannabis therapy to veterans in states that allow for its therapeutic use.

McClintock/Polis Amendment

Seeks to halt Justice Department interference among individuals and businesses engaged in state-compliant transactions particular to both the medical or recreational use of cannabis.

Rohrabacher/Farr Amendment

Prohibits the Department of Justice from interfering with state medical marijuana programs and the patients who rely on them.

House of Representatives

Beto O’Rourke (D)

TEXAS

 

Grade: B+

Votes

Cosponsor

*H.R. 525 Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015
H.R. 667 Veterans Equal Access Act
H.R. 1635 Charlotte’s Web Medical Access Act of 2015
H.R. 1940 Respect State Marijuana Laws Act of 2015
H.R. 1538 CARERS Act of 2015

Joaquin Castro (D)

TEXAS

 

Grade: B

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Lloyd Doggett (D)

TEXAS

 

Grade: B

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Al Green (D)

TEXAS

 

Grade: B

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Gene Green (D)

TEXAS

 

Grade: B

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Ruben Hinojosa (D)

TEXAS

 

NORML Grade: B

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Sheila Jackson Lee (D)

TEXAS

 

Grade: B

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

Eddie Bernice Johnson (D)

TEXAS

 

Grade: B

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

Marc Veasey (D)

TEXAS

 

Grade: B

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Filemon Vela, Jr. (D)

TEXAS

 

NORML Grade: B

Votes

 

No sponsorships or comments

John Carter (R)

TEXAS

 

Grade: C

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

 

Blake Farenthold (R)

TEXAS

 

Grade: C-

Votes

No sponsorships or commentsnt.