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Virginia Marijuana Law, Regulation, Penalties, Attornies & Congressman

Virginia Marijuana Penalties

 
Offense Penalty Incarceration   Max. Fine  

Possession

Less than 1/2 oz (first offense) Misdemeanor 30 days $ 500
Less than 1/2 oz (subsequent offense) Misdemeanor 1 year $ 2,500

Sale/Manufacture/Trafficking

1/2 oz – 5 lbs Felony 1* – 10 years $ 2,500
5 lbs – 100 kg Felony 5* – 30 years $ 1,000
More than 100 kg Felony 20 years* – life $ 100,000
To a minor who is at least 3 years younger Felony 2* – 50 years $ 100,000
Within 1000 ft of a school or school bus stop Felony 1* – 5 years $ 100,000
Manufacture of marijuana Felony 5* – 30 years $ 10,000
Transporting more than 5 lbs into the state Felony 5* – 40 years $ 1,000,000
Includes possession with intent to distribute
* Mandatory minimum sentence

Hash & Concentrates

Possessing hashish oil Felony 1 – 10 years $ 2,500
Manufacturing, selling, giving, distributing, or possessing with intent Felony 5 – 40 years $ 500,000
Bringing more than 1 oz of hashish oil into the state Felony 5 – 40 years $ 1,000,000
Subsequent offenses carry greater penalties

Paraphernalia

Sale or possession with intent to sell paraphernalia Misdemeanor 1 year $ 2,500
To a minor who is at least 3 years younger Felony 1 year $ 2,500

Civil Asset Forfeiture

Vehicles and other assets can be seized in a civil proceeding, regardless of whether criminal charges are brought.

Miscellaneous

Maintaining a fortified drug house Felony 1* – 10 years N/A
* Mandatory minimum sentence

Penalty Details

Possession

Possession of marijuana is a Class I misdemeanor punishable by no more than 30 days in jail and/or a find of up to $500 for a first offense. A second or subsequent offense is punishable with up to 12 months in jail and/or a up to $2,500 fine. Possession of less than a one half ounce of marijuana is simple possession (possession for personal use).

See

  • Va. Code Ann. §§ 182.248-250
Conditional Release

First time offenders may be placed on probation instead of receiving jail time, if the offender agrees to undergo and pay for a series of drug tests during probation and a drug treatment program. Probation terms may also require up to 24 community service hours for a misdemeanor conviction and up to 100 hours for a felony conviction. The conviction still shows up on the offender’s record as a conviction and applicable driver’s license revocation proceedings are not waived. Violations of the terms of probation can lead to the full penalty as otherwise applicable.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. §18.2- 251 (2015)

Sale/Delivery

In VA, having a large quantity of marijuana is not proof of intent to distribute alone. Distributing more than a half-ounce of marijuana, but less than 5 pounds, is a Class 5 felony, punishable by at least one year but not more than 10 years in jail. For a first offense, the judge may use his discretion to sentence the offender to a term in jail for not more than 12 months and a fine of not more than $2,500.

See

  • Va. Code. Ann. § 18.2-248.1 (2015)

Distributing more than 5 pounds, but less than 100kg., of marijuana is a felony punishable by no less than 5 and no more than 30, years in prison.

See

  • Va. Code. Ann. § 18.2-248.1 (2015)

Distributing more than 100kg of marijuana is punishable with an automatic 20 years to life sentence, with 20 years being the mandatory minimum sentence. This mandatory minimum may be reduced by the judge if:

  1. the person does not have a prior conviction for an drug-related offense;
  2. the person did not use violence or credible threats of violence or possess a firearm or other dangerous weapon in committing the offense and did not convince another participant in the offense to do so;
  3. the offense did not result in death or serious bodily injury to any person;
  4. the person was not an organizer, leader, manager, or supervisor of others in the offense, and was not engaged in a continuing criminal enterprise; and
  5. the offender cooperates with police and judicial officials by providing to the State all information and evidence the person has concerning the offense, but the fact that the person has no relevant or useful other information to provide or that the Commonwealth already is aware of the information shall not preclude a determination by the court that the defendant has complied with this requirement.

A third sale or intent to distribute conviction brings a mandatory minimum sentence of 5 years.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. §18.2-248 (H) (2015)

Distributing more than 1 ounce of marijuana to any person under 18 years of age who is at least 3 years younger than the offender, or using such a minor to distribute more than 1 ounce of marijuana, is a felony and will be punished with a mandatory minimum jail sentence of 5 years, a maximum sentence of 50 years, and a fine of no more than $100,000.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-255 (2015)

Distributing 1 ounce of marijuana or less to any person under 18 years of age who is at least 3 years younger than the offender, or using such a minor to distribute less than 1 ounce of marijuana, is a felony and will be punished with a mandatory minimum jail sentence of 2 years, a maximum sentence of 50 years, and a fine of no more than $100,000.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-255 (2015)

Distributing more than a half-ounce of marijuana within 1,000 ft. of a school or school bus stop is a felony, punishable with a mandatory minimum sentence of 1 year and a maximum sentence of 5 years, plus a fine not to exceed $100,000. However, if such person proves that he sold such controlled substance or marijuana only as an accommodation to another individual and not with intent to profit thereby, he shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor, punishable by confinement in jail for not longer than 12 months and a fine not to exceed $2,500.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-255.2 (2015)
  • Va. Code Ann. § 63.2-100 (2015)
Manufacture

Any person who manufactures marijuana, or possesses marijuana with the intent to manufacture such substance, not for his own use is guilty of a felony punishable by mandatory imprisonment of not less than five, nor more than 30, years and a fine not to exceed $10,000.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. § 18,2-248.1 (2015)
Trafficking

Transporting 5lbs or more of marijuana into Virginia with the intent to distribute it is a felony, punishable with a mandatory minimum sentence of 5 years, a maximum sentence of 40 years, and a fine not to exceed $1,000,000. A second or subsequent conviction for the same crime raises the mandatory minimum sentence to 10 years.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-248.01 (2015)

Hash & Concentrates

In Virginia, hashish and concentrates fall under the definition of marijuana as long as they contain less than 12 percent of THC by weight, meaning that the restrictions and penalties associated with marijuana also apply to hashish and concentrates. Hashish oil, falls outside the definition of marijuana and is Schedule I substance. Possessing hashish oil is a Class 5 felony punishable by a term of imprisonment no less than 1 year and no greater than 10 years. For a first offense, the judge or jury may reduce the sentence to a term of imprisonment no greater than 1 year and/or a fine of $2,500.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-247(D)

Manufacturing, distributing, or possessing with intent to manufacture, sell, or give hashish oil is punishable by no less than 5 years and no greater than 40 years imprisonment and a fine no greater than $500,000. A second conviction carries a term of imprisonment no less than 5 years, the mandatory minimum, and up to the remainder of the offender’s life. A third conviction carries a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment for no less than five years and up to the remainder of the offender’s life.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. §18.2-248 (C) (2015)

More than 1 ounce of hashish oil into Virginia is a felony, punishable by a no less than 5 years imprisonment and no greater than 40 years, with a minimum term of 3 years and a fine no greater than $1,000,000. A second conviction increases the minimum term of imprisonment to 10 years.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. §18.2-248.01 (2015)

Distributing hashish oil to a person under 18 years of age, or using a person under the age of 18 in the distribution of hashish oil is a crime if the minor is 3 years the offenders junior. The crime is punishable by a fine of $100,000 and a term of imprisonment no less than 10 years and no greater than 50 years, with a minimum term of imprisonment of 5 years.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. §18.2-255(a) (2015)

Manufacturing, distributing, or possessing hashish oil with intent to sell, give, or distribute hashish oil near certain designated areas is a felony punishable by a term of imprisonment no less than 1 year and no greater than 5 years and/or a fine no greater than $100,000. A second conviction is punishable by a mandatory minimum term of imprisonment no less than 1 year and no greater than 5 years and/or a fine no greater than $100,000.

The designated areas include:

• all areas open to the public within 1,000 feet of any school or marked child day care facility or school buses; all areas open to the public within 1,000 feet of a school bus stop during hours where the bus stop is in use; public community or recreation centers; public libraries; all areas open to the public within 1,000 feet of a hospital or, out-patient center; or any other state operated medical facility.

See

  • Va Code Ann. §18.2-255.2 (2015)
  • Va Code Ann §37.2-100 (2015)

Any person who sells or possesses with intent to sell drug paraphernalia, knowing that it is either designed for use or intended by such person for use to illegally plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, inhale, or otherwise introduce into the human body marijuana is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor, punishable by no more than 12 months in jail and a fine of no more than $2,500.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. §§ 18.2-11- 18.2-265.3 (2015)

Any person eighteen years of age or older who sells drug paraphernalia to a minor who is at least three years junior to the accused is guilty of an additional Class 6 felony, which is punishable by not more than 12 months in jail and a fine of not more than $2,500.

See

  • Va. Code. Ann § 18.2-265.3 (2015)

Advertising for the sale of drug paraphernalia is a Class I misdemeanor with a punishment of confinement for not more than 12 months in jail and a fine of not more than $2,500.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. §18.2-265.5 (2015)

Knowingly distributing any printed material the distributor knows contains advertisements for drug paraphernalia is a Class 1 misdemeanor, punishable by confinement in jail for not more than 12 months and a fine of not more than $2,500.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. §18.2-265.5 (2015) 

Miscellaneous

Fortified drug house

Maintaining a fortified drug house is a Class 5 felony, punishable with a mandatory minimum sentence of 1 year, and a maximum sentence of 10 years.

See

  • Va. Code Ann. §18.2-258.02 (2015)

Enactment of SB 1091 and HB 2051 in 2017 amends state law so that minor marijuana offenses are no longer punishable by a mandatory driver’s license suspension. Juvenile offenders still face an automatic license suspension for any drug related conviction.

See

  • Virginia SB 1091
  • Virginia SB 2051
Conditional Release

The state allows conditional release or alternative or diversion sentencing for people facing their first prosecutions. Usually, conditional release lets a person opt for probation rather than trial. After successfully completing probation, the individual’s criminal record does not reflect the charge.

Drugged Driving

This state has a per se drugged driving law enacted. In their strictest form, these laws forbid drivers from operating a motor vehicle if they have a detectable level of an illicit drug or drug metabolite (i.e., compounds produced from chemical changes of a drug in the body, but not necessarily psychoactive themselves) present in their bodily fluids above a specific, state-imposed threshold.

Hemp

This state has an active hemp industry or has authorized research. Hemp is a distinct variety of the plant species cannabis sativa L. that contains minimal (less than 1%) amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Various parts of the plant can be utilized in the making of textiles, paper, paints, clothing, plastics, cosmetics, foodstuffs, insulation, animal feed, and other products. For more information see NORML’s Industrial Use section.

Mandatory Minimum Sentence

When someone is convicted of an offense punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence, the judge must sentence the defendant to the mandatory minimum sentence or to a higher sentence. The judge has no power to sentence the defendant to less time than the mandatory minimum. A prisoner serving an MMS for a federal offense and for most state offenses will not be eligible for parole. Even peaceful marijuana smokers sentenced to “life MMS” must serve a life sentence with no chance of parole.

Medical CBD

This state has passed a medical CBD law allowing for the use of cannabis extracts that are high in CBD and low in THC for any “medical condition” for which a physician recommends it.

Virginia Drugged Driving

In Virginia, it is unlawful for any person to drive or operate a motor vehicle while such person is under the influence of marijuana to a degree which impairs his ability to drive or operate the motor vehicle safely. Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-266 (West 2010).

Implied Consent

  • Any person, whether licensed by Virginia or not, who operates a motor vehicle upon a highway in the Commonwealth shall be deemed thereby as a condition of such operation to have consented to have samples of his blood, breath, or both blood and breath taken for a chemical test to determine the presence of controlled substance. Id. § 18.2-268.2(A).
  • If accused does not wish to submit to chemical testing, no test(s) shall be given. However, such refusal will be in violation of implied consent statutes and subject to penalties. Id. § 18.2-268.3(A).
  • Offender’s first refusal to submit to testing is a civil offense and subsequent violations are criminal offenses. Id. § 18.2-268.3(C).
  • First refusal the court shall suspend the defendant’s privilege to drive for a period of one year. Id.
  • Second refusal (w/i 10 years) refusal is a Class 2 misdemeanor -the court shall suspend the offender’s privilege to drive for a period of three years. Id.
  • Third refusal (w/i 10 years) Class 1 misdemeanor – the court shall suspend the offender’s privilege to drive for a period of three years. Id.
  • A person charged with DUI has no constitutionally guaranteed right to speak with an attorney before submitting to testing. In some cases accused may attempt to contact an attorney, but unreasonable delays, failure to reach attorney or anything else which would frustrate or nullify the intent of the Implied Consent statute will not shield accused from penalties for refusal if accused does not submit to testing — notwithstanding lack of counsel. Coleman v. Com., 187 S.E.2d 172(1972); Deaner v. Com., 170 S.E.2d 199, 204(1969); Law v. City of Danville, 187 S.E.2d 197(1972).
  • Accused does not have a right to choose which test (breath/blood/urine) is to be administered. Virginia Implied Consent statute calls for breath test, but if a breath test is unavailable or an officer suspects impairment by drugs, a blood test may be given. Lamay v. Com.,513 S.E.2d 411(1999).

Penalties

  • First offense class one misdemeanor – mandatory fine of $250; offender is denied the right to drive for one year; as a condition of restoration of driving privileges the court may order the installation of an ignition interlock device on any vehicle driven by offender. Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-270(A) (West 2010); Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-271(A) (West 2010).
  • Second offense (w/i 5 years) – mandatory minimum fine of $ 500; confinement in jail for not less than one month nor more than one year; twenty days confinement shall be a mandatory minimum sentence; offender is denied the right to drive for three years; as a condition of restoration of driving privileges the court may order the installation of an ignition interlock device on any vehicle driven by offender.18.2-270(B)(1); 18.2-271(B); 18.2-270.1(B)
  • Second offense (w/i 5 to 10 years) – mandatory minimum fine of $ 500; confinement in jail for not less than one month – ten days of such confinement shall be a mandatory minimum sentence; offender is denied the right to drive for three years; as a condition of restoration of driving privileges the court may order the installation of an ignition interlock device on any vehicle driven by offender. 18.2-270(B)(2); 18.2-271(B); 18.2-270.1(B)
  • Third offense (w/i 10 years) class 6 felony – a mandatory minimum sentence of 90 days; minimum fine of $1,000; offender’s vehicle is subject to seizure by state; offender’s license is suspended indefinitely; as a condition of restoration of driving privileges the court may order the installation of an ignition interlock device on any vehicle driven by offender. 18.2-270(C)(1); 18.2-271(C) 18.2-270.1(B)
  • Third offense (w/i 5 to 10 years) felony – mandatory minimum sentence of confinement for six months; mandatory fine of a $ 1,000; offender’s vehicle is subject to seizure by state; offender’s license is suspended indefinitely; as a condition of restoration of driving privileges the court may order the installation of an ignition interlock device on any vehicle driven by offender.18.2-270(C)(1),(3); 18.2-271(C); 18.2-270.1(B)
  • Fourth and subsequent (w/i 10 years) felony – mandatory minimum term of imprisonment of one year; mandatory minimum fine of $ 1,000; license suspension of up to three years; offender’s vehicle is subject to seizure by state; offender’s license is suspended indefinitely; as a condition of restoration of driving privileges the court may order the installation of an ignition interlock device on any vehicle driven by offender. 18.2-270(C)(2),(3); 18.2-271(C); 18.2-270.1(B).

Other Penalties & Penalty Enhancers

  • DUI while transporting a person 17 years of age or younger carries an additional minimum fine of $ 500, and a mandatory minimum period of confinement of five days. 18.2-270(D)
  • Mandatory minimum punishments imposed pursuant to this section shall be cumulative, and mandatory minimum terms of confinement shall be served consecutively. However, punishment may not exceed maximum punishment allowed by statute. 18.2-270(F).

Sobriety Checkpoints

In Virginia, sobriety checkpoints are upheld under state and federal Constitution.

Legally executed driving maneuvers which reverse a driver’s course and take driver away from a checkpoint do not justify an investigatory stop, Bass v. Commonwealth, 525 S.E.2d 921 (2000); Murphy v. Commonwealth, 384 S.E. 2d 125 (1989).

However, certain conspicuous avoidance maneuvers which do not fit with the flow of traffic may justify an investigatory stop, Commonwealth v. Eaves, 408 S.E. 2d 925 (1991); Stroud v. Commonwealth, 370 S.E. 2d 721 (1988); Brown v. Commonwealth, 440 S.E, 2d 619 (1994).

Case Law

Coffey v. Com., 116 S.E.2d 257 (1960) — To convict for DUI, prosecution must do more than engender only a suspicion probability of guilt – prosecution may not even leave a hypothesis of innocence.

Oliver v. Com., 577 S.E.2d 514 (2003) — Test results from a breath or blood test are not necessary or required to prove driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs; test results are additional proof that can corroborate evidence of the objective symptoms of impairment.

Ngomondjami v. Com., 54 Va.App. 310, 317, 678 S.E.2d 281, 284 (Va.App.,2009) –“‘Operating” a car not only includes the process of moving the vehicle from one place to another, but also includes “starting the engine, or manipulating the mechanical or electrical equipment of the vehicle without actually putting the car in motion. It means engaging the machinery of the vehicle which alone, or in sequence, will activate the motive power of the vehicle.’

Per Se Drugged Driving Laws

Virginia has a per se drugged driving law enacted for controlled substances, not including cannabis or cannabis metabolites. (Virginia State Code, Section 18.2-266)

Virginia’s law took effect in July 2005.

Virginia Hemp Law

Year Passed: 2015
Summary: Senate Bill 955 allows for the cultivation of industrial hemp by licensed growers of industrial hemp as part of a university-managed research program. The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is in charge of regulating and establishing industrial hemp research programs by public institutions of higher education. 
Statute: Va. Code. Ann. § 3.2-4112 (2015)

Verified Virginia Marijuana Attornies /Lawyer

Paul Liam McGlone

703-273-2750

Paul Liam McGlone

McGlone Law Firm, P.C.
10513 Judicial Dr Suite 101

Fairfax, VA22030

www.mcglonelaw.com

Phone: 703-273-2750

Rebecca Wade

703-721-4601

Rebecca Wade

Wade, Grimes, Friedman, Meinken & Leischner, PLLC
500 Montgomery St., Suite 575

Alexandria, VA 22314

www.oldtownlawyers.com

Phone: 703-721-4601

Marina Medvin

888-886-4127

Marina Medvin

MEDVIN LAW FIRM
916 Prince Street

Alexandria, VA 22314

medvinlaw.com

Phone: 888-886-4127

Raj Dua

703-539-8092

Raj Dua

The Dua Law Firm PLLC
3923 Old Lee Hwy Ste 63A

Fairfax, VA 22030

www.fairfaxcriminalattorney.com

Phone: 703-539-8092

Justin Ervin

703-962-7790

Justin Ervin

Ervin Kibria PLLC
4023 Chain Bridge Rd Suite 5

Fairfax, VA 22030

www.ervinkibrialaw.com

Phone: 703-962-7790

Brenton Vincenzes

703-665-3719

Brenton Vincenzes

Vincenzes Law, PLLC
11325 Random Hills Road Suite 360

Fairfax, VA 22030

www.VincenzesLaw.com

Phone: 703-665-3719

Shawn Stout

703-530-9001

Shawn Stout

The Irving Law Firm
9001 Center Street

Manassas, VA20110

Phone: 703-530-9001

Chad Dorsk

757-423-0271

Chad Dorsk

Dorsk Law Office, Plc.
500 E. Plume Street Suite 220

Norfolk, VA 23510

dorsklawoffice.com

Phone: 757-423-0271

William Theodore Linka

804-643-7311

William Theodore Linka

Richmond Criminal Law
7 South 1st Street

Richmond, VA 23219

www.richmondcriminallaw.com

Phone: 804-643-7311

Michelle Derrico

540-343-9349

Michelle Derrico

Copenhaver, Ellett & Derrico
30 Franklin Road SW Ste 200

Roanoke, VA 24011

www.roanokecriminalattorney.com

Phone: 540-343-9349

Michelle Derrico

Member

 

Braden Carroll

757-610-9564

Braden Carroll

Virginia Beach Criminal Defense
1244 Perimeter Parkway Suite 441

Virginia Beach, VA 23454

www.bccriminal.com

Phone: 757-610-9564

Virginia Congress

 

Senate Bills

Daines/Merkley Veterans Equal Access Amendment

Permits physicians affiliated with the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to recommend cannabis therapy to veterans in states that allow for its therapeutic use. More info

Mikulski Amendment Protecting State Medical Marijuana Laws

Limits the Justice Department’s ability to take criminal action against state-licensed operations that are acting in full compliance with the medical marijuana laws of their states. More info

Merkley Marijuana Banking Amendment

Prohibits the US Treasury Department from using federal funds to take punitive actions against banks that provide financial services to marijuana-related businesses that are operating legally under state laws. More info‘N/A’ means that the Senator did not have the opportunity to vote on this amendment

Virginia Senators

Mark Warner (D)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: B

Votes

Cosponsor

S. 1333: Therapeutic Hemp Medical Access Act of 2015
S. 134: Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015

Comments

When contacted by NORML a staffer responded, “Senator Warner supports the use of medical marijuana when used appropriately, and thinks that Virginia should “wait until there is more data from Colorado and Washington state” in terms of legalizing marijuana for non-medical use.”

Tim Kaine (D)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: C+

Votes

Comments

“I’ve never been a legalization fan. I just haven’t been. Just for a whole series of both health- and sort of crime-related reasons, I think that would not be a good idea.”

“I have generally been for reexamination of sentences because I think often, for sentences for marijuana and marijuana usage, I think some sentences are too strict,” he said. “These are often, if they’re nonviolent crimes, I think it could be handled in a different way on a sentencing standpoint. But in terms of the decriminalization of marijuana, I’ve never been a proponent.”

He “support[s]drastic changes in sentencing laws” but “wouldn’t vote for a law at the federal or state level that would decriminalize marijuana.”

“I actually kind of like this notion of the states as labs and they can experiment [with legalizing marijuana]and we can see what happens,” he said.

Read more (Link)

House Bills

Veterans Equal Access Amendment

Permits physicians affiliated with the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to recommend cannabis therapy to veterans in states that allow for its therapeutic use. More info

McClintock/Polis Amendment

Seeks to halt Justice Department interference among individuals and businesses engaged in state-compliant transactions particular to both the medical or recreational use of cannabis. More info

Rohrabacher/Farr Amendment

Prohibits the Department of Justice from interfering with state medical marijuana programs and the patients who rely on them. More info

Senators

Don Beyer (D)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: A

Votes

Cosponsor

H.R. 2076: Marijuana Businesses Access to Banking Act of 2015
H.R. 667: Veterans Equal Access Act
H.R. 1013: Regulate Marijuana like Alcohol Act
H.R. 1538: CARERS Act of 2015
H.R. 3518: Stop Civil Asset Forfeiture Funding for Marijuana Suppression Act of 2015

Gerry Connolly (D)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: B

Votes

Cosponsor

H.R. 525 Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015
H.R. 1538 CARERS Act of 201

Scott Rigell (R)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: B

Votes

Cosponsor

H.R. 1635 Charlotte’s Web Medical Access Act of 2015

Bobby Scott (D)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: B

Votes

Cosponsor

H.R. 525 Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015

 Robert Hurt (R)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: C

Votes

Cosponsor

H.R. 525 Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015
H.R. 1774 Compassionate Access Act

Morgan Griffith (R)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: C-

Votes

Cosponsor

*H.R. 5549 Medical Marijuana Research Act of 2016

 

Dave Brat (R)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Barbara Comstock (R)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Bob Goodlatte (R)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: D

Votes

No sponsorships or comments

Rob Wittman (R)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: C

Votes

Cosponsor

H.R. 1635: Charlotte’s Web Medical Access Act of 2015

 

Randy Forbes (R)

VIRGINIA

 

Grade: F

Votes

No sponsorships or comments